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What Two Psychologists and a Hedge-Fund Manager Can Teach You About Persistence

What Two Psychologists and a Hedge-Fund Manager Can Teach You About Persistence

The 150+ internal innovators I’ve interviewed over recent years all have precisely one thing in common. This thing they share is not any of the traits we typically associate with successful innovators: not creativity, customer insight, or influence; not technical knowledge, team leadership skills, or marketing prowess.

No … the one thing they share is this: persistence. They don’t give up.

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How the Hype Cycle Can Help You Make Sense of the Future

How the Hype Cycle Can Help You Make Sense of the Future

While working on an analysis for a client, attempting to assess the key trends that will shape the future of apparel, my mind turns to how an emerging technology in any industry can rise, fall, and eventually succeed. To help understand how trends like artificial intelligence, blockchain, or big data will affect any client, we often turn to the “hype cycle.”

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The Math Behind Big Thinking

The Math Behind Big Thinking

If you are thinking this is a motivation piece about the power of ambitious thinking, it’s not. What I’m going to lay out here has nothing to do with psychology or inspiration. This is basic math. A concept so simple, you will grow frustrated that your company doesn’t embrace it. My 11-year-old gets it. But the $50b company I worked with yesterday doesn’t.

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5 Approaches To Incentivizing Innovation From P&G, 3M, Google, and More

5 Approaches To Incentivizing Innovation From P&G, 3M, Google, and More

People often ask me how to incentivize entrepreneurial behavior from within an established organization. My first answer is “stop killing it.” Leaders put so many barriers and shut doors in front of would-be internal entrepreneurs that just lifting a few barriers or leaving a few doors ajar would on their own create a momentous acceleration in their flow of innovation.

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Why L’Oreal, Wal-Mart, and Target are Building Innovation Sidecars … and You Should Too

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For over a decade now, corporations have been seeking to understand how to better prepare themselves against the onslaught of technology firms spreading their way into nearly every sector, from banking to real estate to retail. They created incubation groups, acquired startups, sought to create a “culture of innovation.”

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Why Big Companies Are Killed By Small Disruptors

Why Big Companies are killed by small

Why do big companies change so slowly and die? They dramatically underestimate innovation velocity.

Innovation velocity is the speed and direction of growth that an innovation creates. Small disruptive organisations have very high innovation velocity and this is why they kill big slow incumbents.